Recessional by Rudyard Kipling –The US’s Vicious Colonial War – LewRockwell.com

Recessional

BY RUDYARD KIPLING

1897

God of our fathers, known of old,

Lord of our far-flung battle-line,

Beneath whose awful Hand we hold

Dominion over palm and pine—

Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,

Lest we forget—lest we forget!

The tumult and the shouting dies;

The Captains and the Kings depart:

Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,

An humble and a contrite heart.

Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,

Lest we forget—lest we forget!

Far-called, our navies melt away;

On dune and headland sinks the fire:

Lo, all our pomp of yesterday

Is one with Nineveh and Tyre!

Judge of the Nations, spare us yet,

Lest we forget—lest we forget!

If, drunk with sight of power, we loose

Wild tongues that have not Thee in awe,

Such boastings as the Gentiles use,

Or lesser breeds without the Law—

Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,

Lest we forget—lest we forget!

For heathen heart that puts her trust

In reeking tube and iron shard,

All valiant dust that builds on dust,

And guarding, calls not Thee to guard,

For frantic boast and foolish word—

Thy mercy on Thy People, Lord!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Recessional” is a poem by Rudyard Kipling, which he composed for the occasion of Queen Victoria‘s Diamond Jubilee in 1897.

The poem is a prayer. It describes two fates that befall even the most powerful people, armies and nations, and that threatened England at the time: passing out of existence, and lapsing from Christian faith into profanity. The prayer entreats God to spare “us” (England) from these fates “lest we forget” the sacrifice of Christ.

The poem went against the celebratory mood of the time, providing instead a reminder of the transient nature of British Imperial power.[1] In the poem Kipling argues that boasting and jingoism, faults of which he was often accused, were inappropriate and vain in light of the permanence of God.

Kipling had previously composed his more famous poem “The White Man’s Burden” for Victoria’s jubilee, but replaced it with “Recessional”. “Burden” was published two years later, altered to fit the theme of theAmerican imperialist expansion after the Spanish-American War.[2]

In Australia[3] and New Zealand[4] “Recessional” is sung as a hymn on Anzac Day, to the tune “Melita” (“Eternal Father, Strong to Save“).

The Anglican Church of Canada adopted “Recessional” as a hymn[5] and a unique musical version of the hymn is included in the 1985 hymnal of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[6]

[gview file=”https://troutinmilk.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/The_Fourth_British_Defeat_in_Afghanistan.pdf”]

via Recessional by Rudyard Kipling : The Poetry Foundation.

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